Kidney Stones And High Levels Of Calcium. Part 1 of 3

Kidney Stones And High Levels Of Calcium – Part 1 of 3

Kidney Stones And High Levels Of Calcium. Some relatives who develop recurring kidney stones may also have high levels of calcium deposits in their blood vessels, and that could resolve their increased risk for heart disease, new research suggests. “It’s becoming clear that having kidney stones is a bit like having raised blood pressure, raised blood lipids such as cholesterol or diabetes in that it is another pointer of, or risk factor for, cardiovascular disease and its consequences,” said study co-author Dr Robert Unwin, of University College London. Unwin is currently captain scientist with the AstraZeneca cardiovascular and metabolic diseases innovative medicines and early development science unit, in Molndal, Sweden.

The main message: “is to begin to employ having kidney stones seriously in relation to cardiovascular disease risk, and to practice preventive monitoring and treatments, including diet and lifestyle”. Some 10 percent of men and 7 percent of women improve kidney stones at some point in their lives, and research has shown that many of these people are at heightened risk for high blood pressure, chronic kidney disease and magnanimity disease, the researchers said.

But study author Dr Linda Shavit, a senior nephrologist at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, and her colleagues wanted to find out whether the heart issues that can come to pass in some of those with kidney stones might be caused by high levels of calcium deposits in their blood vessels. Using CT scans, they looked at calcium deposits in the abdominal aorta, one of the largest blood vessels in the body. Of the 111 forebears in the study, 57 suffered recurring kidney stones that were comprised of calcium (kidney stones can be made up of other minerals, depending on the patient’s circumstances, the researchers noted), and 54 did not have kidney stones.

Parts: 1 2 3

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