The New Role Of Stem Cells For Treatment Of Neoplastic Diseases. Part 1 of 3

The New Role Of Stem Cells For Treatment Of Neoplastic Diseases – Part 1 of 3

The New Role Of Stem Cells For Treatment Of Neoplastic Diseases. For sudden myeloid leukemia patients, overactive genes in their leukemic lessen cells (LSC) can translate into a more difficult struggle to overcome their disease and achieve prolonged remission, new research reveals. “In many cancers, specific subpopulations of cells appear to be uniquely accomplished of initiating and maintaining tumors,” the study authors explained in their report. The researchers identified 52 LSC genes that, when highly active, appear to prompt worse outcomes middle acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients.

The finding is reported in the Dec 22/29 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Between 2005 and 2007, consider author Andrew J Gentles, of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and colleagues examined gene activity in a group of AML patients as well as healthy individuals. Separate facts concerning AML tumors in four groups of patients (totaling more than 1000) was also analyzed.

In one of the patient groups, the investigators found that higher activity levels among 52 LSC genes meant a 78 percent peril of death within a three-year period. This compared with a 57 percent risk of death in the same time frame for AML patients with lower gene activity all these specific “signature” genes. In another AML patient group, the research team observed that higher gene activity prompted an 81 percent risk for experiencing a disease impediment over three years, compared with just a 48 percent risk among patients with low gene activity.

Parts: 1 2 3

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