Decrease In Funding For Medical Research Can Have Serious Results. Part 1 of 3

Decrease In Funding For Medical Research Can Have Serious Results – Part 1 of 3

Decrease In Funding For Medical Research Can Have Serious Results. Spending on medical probe is waning in the United States, and this trend could have dire consequences for patients, physicians and the salubriousness care industry as a whole, a new analysis reveals. America is losing ground to Asia, the research shows. And if left unaddressed, this decline in spending could rifle the world of cures and treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, depression and other conditions that plague the human race, said lead author Dr Hamilton Moses III, lurch and chairman of the Alerion Institute, a Virginia-based think tank.

A great expansion in medical research that began in the 1980s helped revolutionize cancer prevention and treatment, and turned HIV/AIDS from a fatal malady to a chronic condition. But between 2004 and 2012, the rate of investment growth declined to 0,8 percent a year in the United States, compared with a growth rate of 6 percent a year from 1994 to 2004, the story notes. “Common diseases that are devastating are not receiving as much of a push as would be occurring if the earlier rate of investment had been sustained”.

America now spends about $117 billion a year on medical research, which is about 4,5 percent of the nation’s out-and-out health care expenses, the researchers report Jan 13, 2015 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Cuts in government funding are the strongest cause for flagging investment in research, they found. Meanwhile, the share of US medical research funding from private industry has increased to 58 percent in 2012, compared with 46 percent in 1994.

Parts: 1 2 3

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