A New Drug From Sea Sponge For The Treatment Of Severe Breast Cancer. Part 3 of 3

A New Drug From Sea Sponge For The Treatment Of Severe Breast Cancer – Part 3 of 3

A third hardship presented Sunday showed that removing more than just the sentinel lymph node, the first lymph node that breast cancer spreads to, may be unnecessary. “If you look at survival, it didn’t appear to make out a difference whether women had their lymph nodes with cancer removed or not, and survival was quite good in both arms of the study,” said study author Dr Armando E Giuliano, number one of the John Wayne Cancer Institute Breast Center in Santa Monica, Calif.

The study, however, only managed to enroll 800 patients out of 1,900 originally intended, although Giuliano felt that it was “unlikely that displacement of these lymph nodes would impact survival. I think we should use this information selectively. Certainly, axillary underarm lymph node dissection for patients with micrometastases seems unwarranted. The denote is overwhelming that this operation may not be necessary”.

Right now, removal of these other cancer-containing lymph nodes is common. A final study, from researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, found that looking for core cancer micrometastases in the sentinel node did not predict which women with breast cancer would live longer, although finding metastases in bone marrow does seem to predict which women are going to meet one’s Maker sooner.

Parts: 1 2 3

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