Symptoms Of A Concussion For Boys And Girls Are Different. Part 3 of 3

Symptoms Of A Concussion For Boys And Girls Are Different – Part 3 of 3

In the second year, amnesia and confusion/disorientation continued to be more common among males than females. In addition, 31 percent of the concussed females complained of drowsiness versus 20 percent of the males, and 14 percent of the females said they were acute to noise, compared with just 5 percent of the males. Concussion researcher Gerard A Gioia, chieftain of pediatric neuropsychology at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC, called the findings “relatively subtle” and “at best hypothesis-generating, significance they are suggestive but in no way conclusive”.

Gioia said one of the study’s limitations is that the reporting system didn’t explain about how the injuries occurred. “The presence of increased amnesia and confusion, two early impairment characteristics, in the males suggests that the injuries between the males and females may have been different”. Future studies will likely address this theory now that the surveillance system has been expanded to include much more detailed information. Preliminary statistics suggest, for instance, that football players tend to get hit on the front of the head, while girls who play soccer or basketball often suffer a blow to the side of the head.

Parts: 1 2 3

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