A New Approach To The Regularity Of Mammography. Part 1 of 3

A New Approach To The Regularity Of Mammography – Part 1 of 3

A New Approach To The Regularity Of Mammography. A recent report challenges the 2009 recommendation from the US Preventive Services Task Force that women between 40 and 49 who are not at anticyclone risk of breast cancer can probably wait to get a mammogram until 50, and even then only need the exam every two years. A well-known Harvard Medical School radiologist, penmanship in the July issue of Radiology, says telling women to wait until 50 is flat out wrong. The task force recommendations, he says, are based on faulty realm and should be revised or withdrawn.

So “We know from the scientific studies that screening saves a lot of lives, and it saves lives among women in their 40s,” said Dr Daniel B Kopans, a professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and chief radiologist in the breast imaging division at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) said its recommendation, which sparked a firestorm of controversy, was based in expertise and would save many women each year from unnecessary worry and treatment.

But the guidelines left most women confused. The American Cancer Society continued to favour annual mammograms for women in their 40s, and young breast cancer survivors shared powerful stories about how screening saved their lives. One main delinquent with the guidelines is that the USPSTF relied on incorrect methods of analyzing data from breast cancer studies.

The risk of breast cancer starts rising gradually during the 40s, 50s and gets higher still during the 60s. But the matter used by the USPSTF lumped women between 40 and 49 into one group, and women between 50 and 59 in another group, and determined those in the younger group were much less likely to develop heart of hearts cancer than those in the older group.

Parts: 1 2 3

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