Electronic Cigarettes And Risk Of Respiratory Infections. Part 1 of 3

Electronic Cigarettes And Risk Of Respiratory Infections – Part 1 of 3

Electronic Cigarettes And Risk Of Respiratory Infections. Vapor from electronic cigarettes may augmentation young people’s risk of respiratory infections, whether or not it contains nicotine, a budding laboratory study has found. Lung tissue samples from deceased children appeared to suffer damage when exposed to e-cigarette vapor in the laboratory, researchers reported in a recent issue of the album PLOS One. The vapor triggered a strong immune response in epithelial cells, which are cells that line the inside of the lung and protect the organ from harm, said lead founder Dr Qun Wu, a lung disease researcher at National Jewish Health in Denver. Once exposed to e-cigarette vapor, these cells also became more susceptible to infection by rhinovirus, the virus that’s the ruling cause of the common cold, the researchers found.

And “Epithelial cells are the first line of defense in our airways. “They protect our bodies from anything dangerous we might inhale. Even without nicotine, this flowing can hurt your epithelial defense system and you will be more likely to get sick”. The new report comes amid a surge in the popularity of e-cigarettes, which are being promoted by manufacturers as a safer alternative to traditional tobacco cigarettes and a viable smoking-cessation aid.

Nearly 1,8 million children and teens in the United States had tried e-cigarettes by 2012, the study authors said in background information. Less than 2 percent of American adults had tried e-cigarettes in 2010, but by most recent year the number had topped 40 million, an increase of 620 percent. For the study, researchers obtained respiratory methodology tissue from children aged 8 to 10 who had passed away and donated their organs to medical science.

Parts: 1 2 3

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