Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder And Type 2 Diabetes. Part 1 of 3

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder And Type 2 Diabetes – Part 1 of 3

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder And Type 2 Diabetes. Women with post-traumatic suffering disorder seem more likely than others to develop type 2 diabetes, with severe PTSD almost doubling the risk, a young study suggests. The research “brings to attention an unrecognized problem,” said Dr Alexander Neumeister, director of the molecular imaging program for appetite and mood disorders at New York University School of Medicine. It’s crucial to treat both PTSD and diabetes when they’re interconnected in women. Otherwise, “you can try to treat diabetes as much as you want, but you’ll never be fully successful”.

PTSD is an disquiet disorder that develops after living through or witnessing a dangerous event. People with the disorder may feel intense stress, suffer from flashbacks or experience a “fight or flight” feedback when there’s no apparent danger. It’s estimated that one in 10 US women will develop PTSD in their lifetime, with potentially severe effects, according to the study. “In the past few years, there has been an increasing limelight to PTSD as not only a mental disorder but one that also has very profound effects on brain and body function who wasn’t involved in the new study.

Among other things, PTSD sufferers gain more weight and have an increased peril of cardiac disease compared to other people. The new study followed 49,739 female nurses from 1989 to 2008 – aged 24 to 42 at the beginning – and tracked weight, smoking, knowledge to trauma, PTSD symptoms and type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes have higher than normal blood sugar levels. Untreated, the disease can cause serious problems such as blindness or kidney damage.

Parts: 1 2 3

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